Library

Filter
  • 2004 Anthony Land
    This case study examines how one district in the Indonesian province of South Sulawesi - Takalar district – took up the challenge of tackling rural poverty through the use of participatory development and community empowerment methodologies. The study looks at the capacity that was required of various local stakeholders, traces the processes through which the district in partnership with the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) undertook to develop the necessary capacity, and discusses the challenges encountered in sustaining interest in and the capacity for participatory...
  • A small NGO, Mazdoor Kisan Shakti Sangathan (MKSS), led an initiative to challenge local government functionaries on disbursements of drought relief funds, and ended up carrying out one of the most energetic civil society campaigns in recent Indian history. It began with researchers sifting for information on projected disbursements as they appeared in government records. These were then corroborated by asking labourers and villagers how much they had actually received, or whether construction and other public works had actually taken place. The results were presented in public hearings, with...
  • The Democracy Trust was conceived as a policy advocacy tool to encourage commitment to the PRSP process among political parties. By ensuring that political parties publicly back policies of development and poverty eradication, the trust has granted the Honduran population a mechanism to hold elected officials to their obligations, and to demand their right to improved and sustainable services. As well, commitments to development thus become state policies and no longer belong solely to the government of the day. Without capacity development, long-term strategies for poverty reduction are...
  • In Guinea Bissau, a group of motivated academics established a national research institute that became a model of sustainability. It introduced management arrangements that balanced fundamental research on the one hand, and consultancy and practical interventions on the other, with the latter funding much of the research. Contributions from external partners were systematically channelled to one-off operations such as training, infrastructure, equipment or time-bound events. Institutional priorities were considered above individual interests. The institute became an anchor for professionals...
  • An experience in Guatemala bears lessons for engagement in post-conflict reconstruction. In this case, an assembly of civil society organizations played a key role in starting to rebuild a country devastated by civil war. They were assisted by donors, which devised a coordinated strategy, with one agency acting as facilitator. The careful construction of a process of dialogue, capacity mapping and eventually the commissioning of pilot development projects helped foster an atmosphere of trust that led to civic regeneration. Source: Lopes and Theisohn (2003) Ownership Leadership and...
  • The South-East Europe Education Cooperation Network (SEE-ECN) is a broadbased, low-cost regional project. It supports the exchange of information, ideas, and know-how for the reform and improvement of education in 11 countries. The network began with a sense of urgency over the need to enhance education standards, and took off through strategic kick-starting from external finance. As a virtual meeting place, it has brought people together and mobilized capacities across the region, stimulating a kind of East-East cooperation, while providing a framework for donor support. Source: Lopes and...
  • Inadequate capacities for policy analysis in transition countries continue to hinder progress. The innovative International Policy Fellowships (IPF) initiative provides policy leaders with the chance to work with mentors on policy projects while remaining in their home countries. Since 1998, more than 150 fellows and alumni have turned to the programme to investigate alternative ways of ushering in much needed reforms. Many have gone on to influence specific policies, promote participatory policymaking, or establish regional or local institutes. Source: Lopes and Theisohn (2003) Ownership...
  • 2005 David Watson, Lissane Yohannes, Adnan Qader Khan
    This report compares the findings of the case studies of capacity building for decentralised education service delivery in Ethiopia and Pakistan (published as ECDPM Discussion Papers 57H and 57G, respectively), in accordance with the Terms of Reference. The report summarises the main features of the two cases in terms of the national contexts, and features of the capacity building experiences in the two countries; compares the main features of the contexts and capacity building experiences with a view to drawing conclusions about the apparent significance of various aspects of these...
  • The preparation of PRSPs offers interesting experiences in civic engagement in policy-making. While participatory policy formulation is highly desirable, its design has proven hard to fashion and continues to be dogged by flaws related to quality and depth, conditionality and ownership of the change process. The preparation of Ethiopia’s recent PRSP demonstrated all of these issues. While it built on lessons learned from earlier papers to attempt more genuine participation, large capacity gaps, government foot-dragging and donors’ occasional undue influence all imposed constraints...
  • 2005 David Watson, Lissane Yohannes
    This report examines capacity building for decentralised education service delivery in Ethiopia. It is one of over 20 case studies connected with the project 'Capacity, Change and Performance' being compiled by ECDPM for GovNet, the Network on Governance and Capacity Development of the OECD's Development Assistance Committee. It attempts to apply the methodological framework adopted for the studies to consider the capacity building challenges posed in improving the delivery of devolved education services in Ethiopia. Two other related papers have been produced - an equivalent...
  • The Estonian government has pursued a policy of integrating ICT into the everyday life of Estonians as well as using it to promote socioeconomic development and good governance. As a result, Estonia has achieved a high level of e-readiness over a short time, with one of the best rates of public access in Europe. These achievements stem from partnerships developed between local and international stakeholders, the innovative use of foundations to provide a legal and institutional framework, and a strong national vision to harness the power of ICT for national development. In this context,...
  • In 1993, Egypt became one of the first countries to produce a national human development report (NHDR). The process cultivated statistical capacities relating to human development indexes and other socioeconomic indicators; indeed, it was only after the 1996 NHDR that poverty terminology came into use. Today, the government’s Five-Year Plan (2002-2006) incorporates analysis and planning from the human development standpoint. Human development indexes were disaggregated at the municipal level in 2002, and efforts are underway to prepare regional human development reports with...
  • A poor community in northern Egypt mobilized itself to improve waste water processing. The Geziret El Sheir project succeeded in establishing a regular and fully functional system for waste water collection and disposal. As confidence grew in its own ability to bring about change, the community embarked on improvements in other aspects of environmental management. All along, local authorities offered vital contributions not only to the project, but also in replicating and upstreaming the experience. Source: Lopes and Theisohn (2003) Ownership Leadership and Transformation: Can We Do Better...
  • Egypt is a middle-income country, with a GDP of around $84 billion (1999/00), or $1,404 per capita. The private sector plays a prominent role in the economy. In recent years, inflation has been brought under control and macroeconomic performance has improved, with the economic growth rate averaging over five percent in the years 1995-2000. The budget deficit in 1999/00, however, was nearly five percent of GDP.  Egypt’s external debt is manageable, amounting to $28.5 billion (2001), or about 32% of GDP. In 1990/91, Egypt embarked on a reform programme, with structural adjustment...
  • In Ecuador, under the aegis of the Dialogue 21 programme, information and communication tools have created room for a public discourse that has brought together social, political, governmental and economic forces around sustainable human development. Together, a spectrum of people have built consensus in a crisis situation, engendering trust and changing previously confrontational and suspicious mindsets. External agencies played a facilitating role, used flexible and adaptive aid instruments, built on the practices of local institutions, and inspired confidence among the different groups....
  • When it broke away from Indonesia, East Timor was left bereft of administrative and technical capacity. Amidst the backdrop of conflict and crisis, UNV made use of volunteers to bridge the gap. This case illustrates two areas where UNV helped build local capacity – in a fisheries project and in civic education – using a mix of skills, knowledge, catalytic technical inputs and innovation. The volunteers themselves were mid-career professionals with a high degree of proficiency. The case profiles how volunteers can serve as powerful instruments of technical cooperation, more so in...
  • The WTO’s Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) Agreement has brought momentous changes to China and its pharmaceutical sector. The country can no longer rely solely on reverse engineering patented medicines for its 1.3 billion people. Further, mortality from chronic diseases such as cancer is rising, the population is ageing and the health needs of the poorest pose an ongoing challenge – all factors that will test China’s health science capacity. This case highlights the response of the Chinese government and scientific community to changing internal...
  • Capacity development does not necessarily require extensive resources. Much depends on the appropriateness of interventions. In this case, a small grant to fund a carefully coordinated exposure and learning trip for a group of junior functionaries of the Chinese government influenced China’s trade and macroeconomic policies when, years later, the functionaries rose through the ranks to become important officials. This short-term project, underpinned by a clear vision and strong commitment on the part of the recipient government, led to lasting and significant impact. It illustrates two...
  • This paper looks at the experience of the Environment and Sustainable Development Unit (ESDU) of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) located in Castries, St Lucia. The unit was originally conceived as the regional implementing arm for projects funded by the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) at the beginning of the 1990s, but has since become a facilitating and bridging organisation responding to the needs of the Member States of the OECS. The study tries to explain ESDU's effectiveness in enhancing its organisational capabilities for performance...
  • The integrated framework (IF) is part of a commitment made by developed countries to assist developing countries in capitalizing on trade liberalization opportunities. In Cambodia, six multilateral agencies participate in managing this framework, while also supporting the mainstreaming of the IF initiative into the national poverty reduction strategy. In 2001, a pilot study of Cambodia’s entry into the international trading system was presented at the Fourth Ministerial meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO), which found it to be among the best examples of the benefits of...