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  • 2012 Mariagrazia Rocchigiani, Mohan Dhamotaran / FAO
    This module is the second in the series designed to improve Capacity Development (CD) approaches in FAO projects and programmes. It includes examples and tools to support endogenous CD processes in the areas of FAO’s mandate. Practitioners also may draw on the other Learning Modules (see Box 1) which cover tools from disciplines such as organization analysis and development, learning event planning, facilitation and instructional science. Learning Module 2 is organized around four major themes: engaging with national/local actors; analysing the context and assessing capacity needs;...
  • 2012 Cecilia de Rosa / FAO
    This Module is the third in a series of four that address capacity development competencies in FAO. It is intended to enhance FAO’s practices in designing, developing, delivering and evaluating its activities in support of learning in Member Countries, while ensuring that learning leads to sustainable capacity development. This Module is intended for FAO technical officers and collaborators who are involved in conceptualizing, planning, managing and coordinating learning initiatives for stakeholders in Member Countries. By reading and practising the guidance of this Module, you will...
  • 2013 Mariagrazia Rocchigiani, Denis Herbel / FAO
    Effective organizations are critical for sustainable development and particularly important for food security and agriculture. For instance, by organizing themselves through producer organizations, smallholder farmers can improve their access to markets, technology and resources and overcome the constraints they face as small-scale individual producers. This, in turn, will help contribute to greater food security. The effectiveness of organizations depends on many factors, but it all starts with careful design and good process involving all stakeholders. This learning module offers tools,...
  • 2014 Niels Keijzer / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik / German Development Institute
    This paper analyses the policies and priorities of the governments of Cambodia and Malawi with respect to capacity development support (CDS), based on secondary research evidence and perceptions of effectiveness from a wide range of stakeholders. The study concentrates on the two governments’ overall objectives and strategies on CDS and contrasts these to the situation in the health and education sectors, as two sectors that generate a strong need for capacity development and attract a significant portion of development cooperation. The study concludes that it is not formal strategies...
  • 2013 United Nations Inter-Agency Team on National Capacity Development / United Nations
    As countries emerge from conflict they often face a critical shortage of civilian capacity. “The journey from war to sustainable peace is not possible in the absence of stronger civilian capacity. Without this capacity, … resilient institutions will not take root and the risk of renewed violence will remain.” Effective national policies, institutions and governing systems are critical to successful recovery from conflict or crisis, and must be a priority from the onset of United Nations involvement. This Guidance Note provides principles, advice and resources for the United...
  • 2014 Richard Batley and Daniel Harris / ODI
    The service characteristics approach, described here, was developed as a tool to explain the political dynamics of particular services. It has been tested and elaborated in discussion with specialists in health, education, water and sanitation, focusing on current debates in each sector. We find that service characteristics may reinforce each others’ effects on the likelihood of competitive provision, on access to and exclusion from services, on monitorability by policymakers and managers, on users’ capacity to organise demands and, ultimately, on the political salience or...
  • 2014 Andrew Robertson, Rupert Jones-Parry and Anne Wolf / Nexus Strategic Partnerships Limited
    Social, economic and political processes are complex, and happen differently at varying speeds in different contexts. Reforms of the public sector have all too often mixed results given that: i) change initiatives are usually politically sensitive; ii) as a result, implementation is complex and all too often ends in failure; and iii) not enough is known about ‘what really works’. This new book, published in connection with the UN Public Service Forum 2014, presents a range of experience in national public service reform, transparency, accountability and inclusive growth and e-...
  • 2014 R. Le Blanc and P. Beaulieu / European Commission
    The Dynamic Capabilities Approach (DCA) is a 4-phase approach intended to provide guidance on how to plan, monitor and evaluate Capacity Development processes in a given sector. It is an approach that has been used in more developed countries, by the private sector and large public organisations around the world to enable the achievement of their strategic plans and build momentum in their development. The DCA is, according to the experts R. Le Blanc and P. Beaulieu, a strategic approach to the logic that is needed to transform political demands and policies (in the form of development...
  • 2009 Anton de Grauwe / UNESCO
    Capacity development is a fundamental action, without which countries will not achieve their development goals.  Without capacity, there is no development.  However, capacity development activities have not always led to the expected impact on capacity: while they have regularly improved individuals' skills, they have seldom succeeded in transforming the organizations to which these individuals belong.  There is a need to examine the reasons for this relative failure and to propose innovative and relevant policies and strategies. This document highlights some foundational...
  • 2014 Gabriel Kuris
    In 1995, the Mexican government instituted a skills-based vocational education and training system to gain a competitive edge in global markets by making it easier for job seekers to signal their qualifications to employers and by modernizing job training nationwide. However, initial efforts to implement the system failed to gain traction among businesses, unions, and educational institutions. In 2007, a new leadership team took over the public trust that was managing the system and reformed its model to better fit the needs of workers and employers. The new model differed from international...
  • 2014 Rachel Jackson
    When Andrés Manuel López Obrador became mayor of Mexico City at the end of 2000, a massive crime wave was sweeping the national capital. From 1995 to 1998, the city’s overall crime rate had nearly tripled. Aware that taking back the streets from criminals would require a new approach, López Obrador brought in an experienced political leader, Marcelo Ebrard Casaubón, to head the Secretariat of Public Security of the Federal District. Together they introduced new systems that could document, map, and analyze crime and lead to more-efficient allocation of police resources and better...
  • 2014 Rachel Jackson
    Following a close and highly contested 2006 presidential race, Mexico faced a crisis of credibility in the management of its elections. An opposition party threatened not to recognize the government as legitimate, citing fraud and unfair treatment by broadcast media during the campaign. Legislators in Mexico’s three largest political parties parlayed the crisis into an opportunity to address long-standing problems in the country’s electoral process. They passed a reform package that prohibited the purchase of radio and television campaign advertisements and gave political parties...
  • 2014 Rushda Majeed
    In 2002, the interim administration of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan sought quick ways to expand economic opportunities for the country’s poorest rural communities and promote a sense of shared national citizenship. Afghanistan had just emerged from 30 years of devastating conflict. Standards of living were low. Younger Afghans had never lived and worked together as members of a shared political community, and some had spent most of their lives abroad as refugees. In response, a team of Afghan decision makers and international partners created a community-driven development...
  • 2013 UNDP / UNDP
    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have performed the most useful function of focusing global attention and effort on addressing the leading issues of our times. They have been an ‘institution of hope’ following a period in which a ‘narrative of progress’ had been largely abandoned and when a lack of imagination and of compassion prevailed (Greig and Turner 2010; Rorty 1999). Not all countries will achieve the goals set, but on many indicators there have been significant gains. But the timeframe for the MDGs ends in 2015 and the leading question has now become...
  • 2011 Oliver Walton / GSDRC / University of Birmingham
    This report assesses the impact and value for money (VFM) of international support to government and rebel capacity building for negotiations. It finds that there has been little sustained analysis of the impact of this kind of support. Few donor evaluations focus specifically on these activities and those that do are often not made public (expert comments). No studies were identified that directly examine the VFM of this kind of support. The report largely relies on available literature and expert comments on the effectiveness of capacity-building support to conflict parties for negotiations...
  • 2013 Sumedh Rao / GSDRC / University of Birmingham
    There are few frameworks for assessing the capacity to cope with humanitarian risks at national scales, and those that exist vary greatly from one country to another; no clear common set of indicators is readily discernible. In general, however, the importance of governance, institutions, planning capacity and information management capacity have been frequently identified as key elements, especially in regional (international) frameworks. International frameworks for assessing risk management capacity often highlight governance and institutional issues. The most prominent overall framework...
  • 2011 Heather Lyne de Ver & Fraser Kennedy / Developmental Leadership Programme
    At the same time as interest in ‘leadership’ as a factor in the processes of development has increased within the international development community, many new Leadership Development Programmes (LDPs) have emerged. The profusion of such programmes operating within the developing world, and the ambiguity with which the concept of ‘leadership’ is often treated, has resulted in difficulty in differentiating amongst (often in reality very different) LDPs. This paper reviews leadership development programmes as a tool for development policy. We argue that donor and...
  • 2008 Fletcher Tembo / ODI
    (Extract from the executive summary of the paper) The LCDF research and development (R&D) phase provided an opportunity for the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV) to jointly explore the fundamental dimensions of SNV’s LCDF concept – starting from its basic assumptions and logic – to see how it can be put into practice in various capacity development (CD) environments. The LCDF initiative has the potential to inform the thinking and practice of the growing consensus of CD as being a ‘beyond training’ approach to...
  • 2013 UNDP / UNDP
    Countries are increasingly using innovative approaches to manage the performance of public policies, programmes and service delivery. These approaches are fostering more inclusive, collaborative and responsive processes across the development cycle: from planning, to implementation, to monitoring and evaluation.Two critical commonalities among the innovations explored in this paper are 1) the increased frequency of input and feedback; and 2) the expanded definition of and outreach to stakholders, including those not traditionally part of the development process. Increased participation is in...
  • 2014 Jonathan Friedman
    In 2007, Indonesia embarked on a multiyear effort to expand an innovative community-driven development program, first started in 1998, into the largest program of its kind in the world. For nearly a decade, the Kecamatan Development Program had empowered communities to determine how they wanted to use funds for their own development, whether for small infrastructure projects, health and education, or microcredit opportunities. Communities planned, implemented, and maintained projects on their own through village and intervillage committees. The program experienced very low levels of...